The Buff Orpington duck is the epitome of a dual-purpose duck. For someone looking for one single “do-it-all” breed, these would be one of my first recommendations. They don’t completely excel in any one area, but neither do they have any major faults. They’re about as perfect as a dual-purpose duck can get.

Buff Orpington
Buff Orpington. Photo courtesy of Kayli at thegaagirl.blogspot.com

Some people call them Buff Orpingtons. Others call them Buffs. Others refer to them as Orpingtons. Either way, they lay a fairly generous sum of 150-220 eggs a year. They weigh 5 to 8 pounds, and they gain weight fast, which means they can be butchered by 8-10 weeks. They don’t fly, are good foragers, are fairly docile, and are relatively good mothers and broodies. They’re listed by the American Livestock Breed Conservancy as threatened. They’re also pretty, and sport rather unusual coloring–buff. Overall, they’re a fantastic choice for anyone looking for a breed they can use for both meat and eggs.

Buff Orpington Duck Infographic

PHOTO AND VIDEO GALLERY

Male Buff Orpington
A male Buff Orpington at an exhibition. Photo courtesy of The Domestic Waterfowl Club of Great Britain.
Female Buff Orpington
A female Buff Orpington at an exhibition. Photo courtesy of The Domestic Waterfowl Club of Great Britain.
Buff Orpington Pair
A Buff Orpington pair at an exhibition. Photo courtesy of The Domestic Waterfowl Club of Great Britain.
Buff Orpington Duckling
A Buff Orpington duckling. Photo courtesy of The Domestic Waterfowl Club of Great Britain.

4 Comments

  1. Hello I have 2 ducks I adopted, I was told they are pecking ducks but doing my research they seem like they are actually Buff Orpington ducks! So my question is I’m having the hardest time figuring out if I have two females or a female and a Duke now the bigger one looked like it was mating with the smaller one but they’re both the same colour basically they don’t have a defined headline or anything so I’m wondering if anyone could help me figure out if they’re both female or if one is male because I don’t want her to be over bread if there is only one female and that I have to get another female duck so she is not hurt…they seem to quack the same but if they are both female and the darker on EIS a little bigger…why would she be “humping” the other female??

    Jackie
    1. Hi Jackie,

      Well, if the seller thought they were Pekins, I think it’s unlikely that they’re really purebred Buff Orpingtons. Maybe they’re a Pekin cross that happened to look like Buff Orpingtons? I’ve also seen ducks that were supposed to be purebred Buff Orpingtons but that didn’t have correct coloring (the drake had a light head), so either that person’s ducks were backyard mixes that looked like Buffs, or they were Buffs that had been bred carelessly and no longer had accurate breed characteristics.

      Yes, actually, females will sometimes look like they’re mating other females, and drakes will also mount other drakes. Sometimes it’s a dominance thing and sometimes it’s the result of strong hormones, if they don’t have any of the opposite sex around.

      If their quacks are the same, then I think they probably are both females. Do they have drake curls? If they’re adults, that’s a good way to tell if you have males or females.

      Hannah

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